Time Map

Time map: screenings, discussion seminars / workshops

S1 The Victorian novel and film adaptation and (re-)presentation [26.02]

The Victorian novel: overview, characteristics, development, content and construction. The modern age as civilisation of the eye and dominance of the visual, techniques of visual representation. The matter of adaptation: what and how? Faithfulness and / or difference. Debate: ‘An adaptation’s double nature does not mean, however, that proximity or fidelity to the adapted text should be the criterion of judgement or the focus of analysis. For a long time, “fidelity criticism,” was the critical orthodoxy in adaptation studies, especially when dealing with canonical works such as those of Pushkin or Dante. Today that dominance has been challenged from a variety of perspectives and with a range of results. And when a film becomes a financial or critical success, the question of its faithfulness is given hardly any thought.’ (Linda Hutcheon, A Theory of Adaptation). Types of adaptation (cf. “faithfulness” or lack of it): (i) transposition, (ii) commentary and (iii) analogy. Gérard Genette’s concepts of ‘hypotext’ and ‘hypertext’.

Bibliography: Brantlinger and Thessing (458-477). Hutcheon (1-32). Radu, Perceptions 136-140. Stam (1-45). Cartmell (85-140). Cartmell and Whelehan (14-39).

S2-S3 Jane Eyre [5-12.03]

The film: Jane Eyre (1996), directed by Franco Zeffirelli, screenplay by Hugh Whitemore, starring: William Hurt, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Anna Paquin. Re-creation of the plot, characters and situations. The novel vs. the film: similarities / differences – the setting: Lowood School, Thornfield Hall: the characters: Jane, Mrs Reed, Helen Burns, Mr Rochester, Bertha Mason; discussion: the scene after the wedding (‘I Will not Be Yours’). Representation and reception.

Bibliography: Radu, Perceptions (170-172). Radu, The Palace of Art (66-74). Allen (180-90), Galea (114-126), Daiches (1064-6), Ford (256-8). James (107-8 and 160-1). Levine (87-99, 108-10, 126-7 and 136-7).

S4-S5 Wuthering Heights [19-26.03]

The film: Wuthering Heights (1992), directed by Peter Kosminsky, screenplay by Anne Devlin, starring: Juliette Binoche, Ralph Fiennes, Janet McTeer. Re-creation of the plot, characters and situations. The novel vs. the film: similarities / differences – the setting: Wuthering Heights, Thrushcross Grange, the moors; characters: Catherine, Cathy, Heathcliff, Hindley, Hareton, Mrs Dean; discussion: the scene of Heathcliff’s last visit to Catherine (‘How Can I Bear It?’). Representation and reception.

Bibliography: Radu, Perceptions (176-182). Radu, The Palace of Art (79-87). Allen (194-8). Galea (128-141). Daiches (1064‑6), Ford (260‑73). James (160-1).

S6-S7 Wuthering Heights (2011 version) [2-16.04]

Wuthering Heights (2011): directed by Andrea Arnold, Screenplay by Andrea Arnold and Olivia Hetreed, starring: Kaya Scodelario, James Howson, Solomon Glave.

S10-S11 Great Expectations [23-30.04]

The film: Great Expectations (2012), directed by Mike Newell, screenplay by David Nicholls, starring: Jeremy Irvine (Pip), Helena Bonham Carter (Miss Havisham), Holliday Grainger (Estella), Ralph Fiennes (Abel Magwitch) and Robbie Coltrane (Jaggers). Re-creation of the plot, characters and situations. The novel vs. the film: similarities / differences: the setting: Satis House, Victorian London; the characters and the impersonating actors: Pip, Estella, Miss Havisham, Abel Magwitch, Jaggers, Joe Gargery; discussion: the final scene between Pip and Estella (‘Estella’). Representation and reception.

Bibliography: Radu, Perceptions (153-156). Radu, The Palace of Art (41-50). Allen (174-82). Galea (89-106). Ford (147-53). Daiches (1059-64). James (170-1). Levine (183-7).

S8-S9 The Hound of the Baskervilles [7-14.05]

The novel The Hound of the Baskervilles (1901-1902) and the film: The Hound of the Baskervilles (1988), directed by Brian Mills, screenplay by John Hawkesworth, dramatized by T.R. Bowen (for Granada Television), starring: Jeremy Brett (Sherlock Holmes), Edward Hardwicke (Dr Watson), Raymond Adamson (Sir Charles Baskerville). Re-creation of the plot, characters, situations and suspense. The novel vs. the film: similarities / differences – the setting: Dartmoor (in the West Country) and the remote countryside, the hound; characters: Sherlock Holmes, Dr Watson (the implied reader). Representation and reception. The character of Sherlock Holmes on the screen today.

Bibliography: Brantlinger and Tessing (260-278). Wynne (38-59, 83-97). Bayard (passim).

S12: Workshop / Project presentations: Adapting Victorian novels to film [21.05]

S13: End-of-term test [4.06]